Ecological Restoration

cc Nicholas Tonelli

cc Nicholas Tonelli

Degraded areas are often excluded from land stewardship efforts, yet they present some of the best opportunities to add conservation value to a property, watershed, or region. With careful planning and execution, restoration projects can deliver wildlife benefits and other ecosystem services quickly and cost-effectively. This is because most degraded habitats are easily accessible and inexpensively priced when put up for sale. High Branch can design a comprehensive restoration strategy that incorporates these or other measures.

cc Nicholas Tonelli

cc Nicholas Tonelli

  • Forest management to restock high-graded woodlands with trees that have financial and ecological value
  • Natural dynamics forestry to mimic the complex natural patterns, heterogeneous age classes, and disturbance and successional processes that characterize wild forests
  • Invasive species control through early detection, prevention, mechanical removal, and herbicide application
  • Erosion control practices, including bank and headcut stabilization, riparian buffers, and wetland restoration
  • Stream habitat upgrades through addition of overhanging shade, woody debris, oxygenating riffles, and removal of barriers to restore passage of water, fish, and aquatic wildlife
  • Borrow pit restoration that incorporates resurfacing, revegetation, and maintenance of some exposed, mineral soil in order to retain some of the wildlife values created by excavation (e.g., turtle nesting or butterfly puddling sites)
  • Mowing and brush-hogging regimes that restore and maintain declining old-field habitat
  • Control of over-browsing through herbivore removal, individual tree protection, and area exclusions (fencing and slash)
  • Control of nuisance birds through aversive stimuli and manipulation of food resources and habitat
  • Corridor management to facilitate plant dispersal and wildlife movement between isolated habitat units